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Water based primer for OPP
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Zdenko Kopjar
science forum beginner


Joined: 16 May 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2005 11:20 am    Post subject: Re: Water based primer for OPP Reply with quote

sorry
"Johanna" <anu-mikko@luukku.com> wrote in message
news:db59754e.0504200214.1f24fb8b@posting.google.com...
Quote:
I looking for water based varnish for printable OPP film. Any
suggestions, where I could start?

Thank you in advance.

Ann
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2005 12:03 am    Post subject: Re: How to make inside of a tube reflective?...tia sal Reply with quote

We do this type of thing but it isnt cheap. You start with a male
mandrel, polish it, evaporate the desired reflective surface on the
OUTER surface, electroform onto that, release male mandrel from the
tube you have made and the reflective surface stays on the inside of
your tube.
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joe frank
science forum beginner


Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 2:53 am    Post subject: Re: How to make inside of a tube reflective?...tia sal Reply with quote

What material is the tube made out of and what are the dimensions?
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sal
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 246

PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 10:52 am    Post subject: Re: How to make inside of a tube reflective?...tia sal Reply with quote

"joe frank" <joe frank@worldnet.att.net> wrote in news:01c57c66$8817d9a0
$5684490c@no-netbios-here:

Quote:
What material is the tube made out of and what are the dimensions?


The composition of the tube is PVC 1 inch in diamter and about a 1 foot
long. Would like to see what will happen if I add other mirrored pvc
attachments at different angles and shine lights into it. Basiclly it's
a large cheap fiber optic cable type of device using different types of
lights.

It's just a test to see what happens nothing more.

I was thinking of mylar (like the shinny ballons) but it's to rigid and
hard to get down the tube. Is thier a mylar paint?
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Guest






PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Exploding Shellac? Reply with quote

Crossposted to sci.chem.coatings where maybe there is someone who
will know the answer.

Tim Douglass wrote:
Quote:
On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 19:19:51 -0400, JoeTaxpayer
JoeTaxpayer@nospam.com> wrote:

...
I understand the solvent soaked rag issue, I leave those out in the yard
to dry and throw out. ...

OIL soaked rags, in particular boiled linseed oil and tung oil or
opther _drying_ oils, that is those that react with oxygen and
polimerize as a serious spontaneous combustion hazard as the
process is exothermic and the material is combustible. Solvent-
soaked rags should also not be kept indoors (for the most part,
not _used_ indoors either) both because of the danger of developing
an explosive atmosphere and for to minimise exposure.

Quote:

Shellac is a natural, organic product. It is quite possible that if it
was a partial can there had been some contamination introduced at some
point that allowed bacteria to grow and eventually produce the
pressure and explosion. About the only thing I can think of.

I thought of that too, but the bacteria in question would have to
survive in a mixture with a high concentration of alcohol. There
are bacteria that do that, they can even contaminate the alcohol
used in hospitals.

Alcohol is an organic base, shellac an organic acid the reason
pre-mixed shellac has a short shelf life is that they react,
degrading the shellac. I think this is the process known as
'aponification'. Does that produce gas?

--

FF
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George1173
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 May 2005
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 4:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Exploding Shellac? Reply with quote

<fredfighter@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:1123339298.351905.300880@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Alcohol is an organic base, shellac an organic acid the reason
pre-mixed shellac has a short shelf life is that they react,
degrading the shellac. I think this is the process known as
'aponification'. Does that produce gas?

Saponification? As in soap-making? Not much NaOH or KOH in the can, I'll

bet.

Look up "ester."
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Guest






PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 10:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Exploding Shellac? Reply with quote

George wrote:
Quote:
fredfighter@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:1123339298.351905.300880@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Alcohol is an organic base, shellac an organic acid the reason
pre-mixed shellac has a short shelf life is that they react,
degrading the shellac. I think this is the process known as
'aponification'. Does that produce gas?

Saponification? As in soap-making?

Yes.

Quote:
Not much NaOH or KOH in the can, I'll
bet.


Alcohols are characterized by an hydroxyl group:

Methanol CH3OH
Ethanol C2H5OH
etc.

Quote:
Look up "ester."

--

FF
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Australopithecus scobis
science forum beginner


Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:03 am    Post subject: Re: Exploding Shellac? Reply with quote

On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 07:41:38 -0700, fredfighter wrote:

Quote:
Alcohol is an organic base, shellac an organic acid the reason
pre-mixed shellac has a short shelf life is that they react,
degrading the shellac. I think this is the process known as
'aponification'. Does that produce gas?

Other poster correctly mentions esters. The word you're looking for is
"saponification," and it's what happens when one makes soap. BTW, it
produces water.

--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad {dot} scientist {dot} com
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Gregg
science forum beginner


Joined: 12 Jun 2005
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2005 11:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Remove Lead (i.e. Pb) marks from an enamel bathtub????? Reply with quote

"NYC Doc" <nd@nd.com> wrote in message
news:3z5Qe.19721$%w.12795@twister.nyc.rr.com...
Quote:

Would anyone have any suggestions on how to remove lead rub marks on an
enamel surface. There were lead weights on the inside of my shower liner
that have created marks over time when they flipped around due to the
billowing of the liner. Nothing I have used has worked.


Tried and Failed:

1) Dremel Moto tool with felt polishing wheel
2) Comet
3) Gojo abrasive hand cleaner

I didn't rub too hard with any of the solutions for fear of damaging the
surface.


Ideas:
1) heat gun + abrasive
2) Dremel felt wheel + abrasive
3) Chemical???

Apart from using aqua regia or hydrofluoric acid, is there anything that
would attack the lead without destroying the enamel?

Any ideas would be much appreciated.

Notes:
It is a metal tub with a, presumably, enamel surface.

What kind of metal?-Steel or cast iron?

What color enamel?
How old is the tub?
All these factors will determine what type of enamel was probably used.
- Antimony or titania based white - high Pb,Cd based enamels for red
etc.....
All this said - have you tried CLR - the stuff to remove hard water stains?
- don't use a heat gun - yet -
Good luck
Gregg
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2005 4:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Remove Lead (i.e. Pb) marks from an enamel bathtub????? Reply with quote

If you are going to all that trouble, and still not getting the marks
out, you may have worn down the porcelain surface on top of cast iron
bathtub. We at Hard Tops can re-surface bathtubs entirely, or just a
spot. Please visit our website at www.HardTops.com to find a refinisher
near you or learn more about our exclusive process. Feel free to send
me an e-mail if I can assist you with anything, or give me a call at
1-800-687-7188.
Thank You + Good Luck!
Jessica
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Cliff
science forum beginner


Joined: 29 May 2005
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:17 am    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 07:27:20 GMT, Michael <gailey@frontiernet.net> wrote:

Quote:
Joe788 wrote:
Today I had a guy telling me that chrome does not stand up to the
weather and environment of a boat that is used in salt water. Now we
are not talking about a propeller here, but various chrome trinkets
around the boat, such as wakeboard racks, speaker enclosures, shifter
knobs, etc.

I was under the impression that chrome was a pretty good coating for
such applications, but did not want to argue for fear of jamming my
foot in my mouth. I know this is a pretty resourceful group when it
comes to random bits of manufacturing related information....(remember
the 900 post thread about the corrosion on the Fadal toolchanger??) .
So, does anybody know where to find any decent online reference
material for chrome plating's resistance to a salt water environment? I
searched around on Google for a few minutes, but could not find
anything of relevance.


One suggestion is Stainless Steel. It looks much like chrome, maybe you
saw SS instead?

http://www.chromplate.com/flash_hard_chrome.html
[
Micro-Cracked Hard Chrome (Bright)

This type of hard chrome offers a number advantages over the standard Hard
Chrome...

Harder and more wear resistant (hardness appox. 1050-1150 Vickers or 70 Rockwell
C).
Offers better corrosion protection than standard hard chrome
Brighter finish than hard chrome

These extra qualities make this mirco cracked hard chrome ideally suited for use
with hydraulic rams which may be operating in dirty environments, if dirt is
liable to lodge in seals, less harm may be done to the ram. For wet or
salt-water environments, an under coat of nickel plating provides a corrosion
resistant layer, that extends the working life of the ram considerably.
]
[
Special Note on Hard Chrome
It is a common misconception that chrome plating provides corrosion protection.
This is not the case, only slight protection is given. Hard Chrome is porous at
the microscopic level, which can let moisture and chemicals through to attack
the base material. If the item is to be used in a damp environment, or where
water based inks are used on printing machines, a layer of Nickel plating is
required, prior to hard chrome plating.
]

I'd think that any fasteners should be of the exact same surface material
(or nonconductive plastics) (to avoid electrolytic corrosion) and that
such should not be joined to other metals (or in contact with them).
I.E.: Use the same plating on any fasteners into a fiberglass boat hull,
don't even think of it with Aluminum or steel.
If this is a submerged application perhaps a sacrificial electrode
could be used as well?
--
Cliff
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Guy Fawkes
science forum beginner


Joined: 15 Dec 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:03 pm    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

disclaimer - spent years as a marine engineer catering to the private
yacht sector.

chrome plate - waste of time and money

galvanised - lovely stuff, but ooh, it's not shiny, yuck.

stainless (various grades) - ooh, it's shiny, personally speaking you
couldn't give me the stuff on a boat, nightmare when used with any
other metal, which it always is in practice, and breaks with little
warning, yet is still used for rigging cos it's shiny..

bronze (various grades) - shiny and most suitable, will de zinc over
time if not protected by sacrificial anodes if installed badly

aluminium - has it's uses, god help you when someone chrome plates it,
or worse still uses a stainless fastener in it, which happens all the
time
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sugna41@hotmail.com
science forum beginner


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:07 pm    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

Titaniaum Alloy works best. Used on GBS system for production platform
on Grand Banks.
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Andrew VK3BFA
science forum beginner


Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:12 pm    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

curious on this one Guy - I am aware of electrolysis, and on a aerial I
am refurbishing, was planning to use stainless steel bolts and clamps
(Its all alumium construction...) - can you suggest something more
suitable?

Andrew VK3BFA.
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Guy Fawkes
science forum beginner


Joined: 15 Dec 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:41 pm    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

Andrew VK3BFA wrote:
Quote:
curious on this one Guy - I am aware of electrolysis, and on a aerial I
am refurbishing, was planning to use stainless steel bolts and clamps
(Its all alumium construction...) - can you suggest something more
suitable?

Andrew VK3BFA.

if "it's all aluminium contruction" means the whole boat, eg something
like a stryker, start being very careful, throwing a handful of copper
into the bilge or fitting a bronze skinfitting can destroy the hull.

my objection to the current trend is that materials are chosen for
their visual appeal, not their suitability for the task in hand.

if the aerial is aluminium, whi not simply make up and aluminium
bracket to mount it on?

rubber seals work very well to avoid water ingress

anodising is cheap, simple, and gives an astonishingly tough and
protective surface finish.

choose the fasteners wisely, and always watch out for "gotchas" like
copper based thread lubes to do a job that could be done by (plain)
grease or tallow.

here's a list of metals, starting from the corroded / anodic / least
noble end, working down to the cathodic end, you'll see that the
chromes and 2xx series stainless which are used in boats cos they are
shiney are some of the worst metals you could choose, you'll also see
"it's made of aluminium I reckon" isn't good enough if you take the
subject seriously.

HTH etc

MAGNESIUM
MAGNESIUM ALLOYS
ZINC
ALUMINUM 5052, 3004, 3003, 1100, 6053
CADMIUM
ALUMINUM 2117, 2017, 2024
MILD STEEL (1018), WROUGHT IRON
CAST IRON, LOW ALLOY HIGH STRENGTH STEEL
CHROME IRON (ACTIVE)
STAINLESS STEEL, 430 SERIES (ACTIVE)
302, 303, 321, 347, 410,416, STAINLESS STEEL (ACTIVE)
NI - RESIST
316, 317, STAINLESS STEEL (ACTIVE)
CARPENTER 20CB-3 STAINLESS (ACTIVE)
ALUMINUM BRONZE (CA 687)
HASTELLOY C (ACTIVE) INCONEL 625 (ACTIVE) TITANIUM (ACTIVE)
LEAD - TIN SOLDERS
LEAD
TIN
INCONEL 600 (ACTIVE)
NICKEL (ACTIVE)
60 NI-15 CR (ACTIVE)
80 NI-20 CR (ACTIVE)
HASTELLOY B (ACTIVE)
BRASSES
COPPER (CA102)
MANGANESE BRONZE (CA 675), TIN BRONZE (CA903, 905)
SILICONE BRONZE
NICKEL SILVER
COPPER - NICKEL ALLOY 90-10
COPPER - NICKEL ALLOY 80-20
430 STAINLESS STEEL
NICKEL, ALUMINUM, BRONZE (CA 630, 632)
MONEL 400, K500
SILVER SOLDER
NICKEL (PASSIVE)
60 NI- 15 CR (PASSIVE)
INCONEL 600 (PASSIVE)
80 NI- 20 CR (PASSIVE)
CHROME IRON (PASSIVE)
302, 303, 304, 321, 347, STAINLESS STEEL (PASSIVE)
316, 317, STAINLESS STEEL (PASSIVE)
CARPENTER 20 CB-3 STAINLESS (PASSIVE), INCOLOY 825NICKEL - MOLYBDEUM -
CHROMIUM - IRON ALLOY (PASSIVE)
SILVER
TITANIUM (PASS.) HASTELLOY C & C276 (PASSIVE), INCONEL 625(PASS.)
GRAPHITE
ZIRCONIUM
GOLD
PLATINUM
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