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Water based primer for OPP
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lysdexia
science forum Guru


Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 1207

PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2006 5:43 am    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

later -> latter
stabalizing -> stablising
abrasion resistant -> abrasion-resistant
no -> not
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Martin H. Eastburn
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:39 am    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

I checked the three portholes I have - three sizes naturally - Three different decks.
Fancy one is from - you know gold braid types - One I think I might be able to
get through!

They did have some tarnish - green - not much and not a coverage thing.

So I know it is a copper based metal at least.
Looking in my "Metals Handbook - page 513 - propose C44500 Admiralty, Phosphorized .02-.1 P.
called a "Tin Brass" - more tin. 70-73 cu, .07 pb .06 Fe .8-1.2 Sn .02-.1 P balance Zn.

The only reason it is called a brass and not a bronze - is the unknown amount of zinc.

Or it is in the something else - I think the names are simply a game.
Copper-silicon alloys (Silicon Bronzes) contain tin and zinc!

SO likely it is by application or by common use is used in the
classification of the copper and copper alloys.

Martin Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
NRA LOH & Endowment Member
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder



Glenn Ashmore wrote:
Quote:
I still don't know why copper, tin, lead or copper, tin, zinc is brass.
Those are leaded bronze to me.



A few basics about brass and bronze.

When the primary components are copper and zinc it is a brass regardless of
any trace modifiers like tin and lead. The type of brass is normally
determined by the amount of zinc.

When the primary components are copper and some other metal it is a bronze.
Again regardless of the modifiers. The type of bronze is determined by the
metal primarily alloyed with the copper and include silicon, manganese,
aluminum and others. Some bronzes are named for the trace modifiers like
phosphorus . Many bronzes may contain tin and zinc but the primary metal is
tin.

There are several brasses that are commonly called bronze because they
contain small amounts of tin. Naval bronze being one of them. Similarly
there are bronzes that are referred to as brass. Red brass or gunmetal is
actually 88% copper, 10% tin, 2% zinc and is therefore a bronze.

To complicate the naval brass issue there is "Navy" bronze which actually is
bronze. Naval M bronze (C922) is 6% tin and 4.5% zinc.


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Glenn Ashmore
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 10:11 am    Post subject: Re: O.T.- Chrome plating on salt water boat items?? Reply with quote

Actually the amount of zinc is known within limits.

Normally you refer to the amount of primary alloying metal as "balance"
because the other components may vary within limits. In the example of
Phosphorized admiralty brass the total of the copper other components can
vary from 70.95% to 74.5% so the zinc will vary from 29.05% to 25.5%. There
is a minimum of 25 times more zinc in it than tin so it is properly a brass.

The confusion between brass and bronze is something you have to watch out
for when buying copper alloys for a corrosive environment. It is surprising
how many metal salesmen don't know the difference.

--
Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
there of) at: http://www.rutuonline.com
Shameless Commercial Division: http://www.spade-anchor-us.com

"Martin H. Eastburn" <lionslair@consolidated.net> wrote in message
news:1138415994_1857@sp6iad.superfeed.net...
Quote:
I checked the three portholes I have - three sizes naturally - Three
different decks.
Fancy one is from - you know gold braid types - One I think I might be
able to
get through!

They did have some tarnish - green - not much and not a coverage thing.

So I know it is a copper based metal at least.
Looking in my "Metals Handbook - page 513 - propose C44500 Admiralty,
Phosphorized .02-.1 P.
called a "Tin Brass" - more tin. 70-73 cu, .07 pb .06 Fe .8-1.2 Sn .02-.1
P balance Zn.

The only reason it is called a brass and not a bronze - is the unknown
amount of zinc.

Or it is in the something else - I think the names are simply a game.
Copper-silicon alloys (Silicon Bronzes) contain tin and zinc!

SO likely it is by application or by common use is used in the
classification of the copper and copper alloys.

Martin Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
NRA LOH & Endowment Member
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder



Glenn Ashmore wrote:
I still don't know why copper, tin, lead or copper, tin, zinc is brass.
Those are leaded bronze to me.



A few basics about brass and bronze.

When the primary components are copper and zinc it is a brass regardless
of any trace modifiers like tin and lead. The type of brass is normally
determined by the amount of zinc.

When the primary components are copper and some other metal it is a
bronze. Again regardless of the modifiers. The type of bronze is
determined by the metal primarily alloyed with the copper and include
silicon, manganese, aluminum and others. Some bronzes are named for the
trace modifiers like phosphorus . Many bronzes may contain tin and zinc
but the primary metal is tin.

There are several brasses that are commonly called bronze because they
contain small amounts of tin. Naval bronze being one of them. Similarly
there are bronzes that are referred to as brass. Red brass or gunmetal
is actually 88% copper, 10% tin, 2% zinc and is therefore a bronze.

To complicate the naval brass issue there is "Navy" bronze which actually
is bronze. Naval M bronze (C922) is 6% tin and 4.5% zinc.


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