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A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief.
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Tom111
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 173

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 5:29 am    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Erwin Hessle" <erwin@erwinhessle.com> wrote in message
news:1152233057.712110.127920@k73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Martin Swain wrote:

Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it
repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one.

If you say it can't repeat indefinitely, you've put a limit on it.

Get out of that one, Einstein.

Interestingly enough, it was Einstein whose theories indicated that the
universe was infinite but bounded.
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Martin Swain
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 5:30 am    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...
Quote:

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!


Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers and
therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers. Only
integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an infinite, but
bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble within the
infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be obeyed by all
possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of possibilities
within that multiverse are infinite.

The set of integers is a subset of the set of real numbers, which is
infinite.

Inifinties can contain infinities. In this case, the Universe, which is
everything,
made infinite, would contain all possibilities. It is by definition, the
biggest possible
set of everything. Unless you specified some subset, say, "universes like
this one",
which is what you are hinting at.
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Martin Swain
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 5:39 am    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...
Quote:

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!


Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers and
therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers. Only
integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an infinite, but
bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble within the
infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be obeyed by all
possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of possibilities
within that multiverse are infinite.

an infinity of infinites = infinity.

The only bound on the infinite set of universes is that is has to contain
only universes, which is no bound at all, because the universe itself
contains everything.
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Martin Swain
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 5:40 am    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Urmrg.43757$B91.13284@edtnps82...
Quote:

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!


Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why?
Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers
and therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers.
Only integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an
infinite, but bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble
within the infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be
obeyed by all possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of
possibilities within that multiverse are infinite.

an infinity of infinites = infinity.

an infinity of *infinities*, sorry for the typo
Quote:

The only bound on the infinite set of universes is that is has to contain
only universes, which is no bound at all, because the universe itself
contains everything.


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Tom111
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 173

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:27 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:jkmrg.43756$B91.10515@edtnps82...
Quote:

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!


Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why?
Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers
and therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers.
Only integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an
infinite, but bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble
within the infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be
obeyed by all possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of
possibilities within that multiverse are infinite.

The set of integers is a subset of the set of real numbers, which is
infinite.

But the set of integers is infinite, too. And bounded.

And the set of all real numbers, although infinite, does not include
imaginary numbers, which means it's bounded, too.

Quote:
Inifinties can contain infinities.

But no infinity has to be unbounded.

Quote:
In this case, the Universe, which is everything,
made infinite, would contain all possibilities.

It would have to contain all possibilities within its boundaries, but not
all possibilities whatsoever.

Quote:
It is by definition, the biggest possible
set of everything.

OK, if you like, we can stipulate that. We don't have to, but, for the sake
of convenience, let's do so anyway. The universe includes all possible
things. It does not include all impossible things. Infinite, but bounded.

Quote:
Unless you specified some subset, say, "universes like this one", which is
what you are hinting at.

I'm not "hinting at" anything. I'm expressing my point clearly and
unambiguously. Just because there are an infinite number of possibilities
to the multiverse does not mean that everything, possible or impossible,
must occur.
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:35 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Erwin Hessle wrote:
Quote:
2 wrote:
"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:R_udnZoRSdU1ojDZnZ2dnUVZ_tOdnZ2d@comcast.com...
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote:
First, if there is an infinity-of-universes then anything you can imagine
exists in one of them. It is a necessary truth. So be comforted that
somewhere you are correct, but not here and now.
Well, not *anything* you can imagine. For example, you might imagine that
the laws of the multiverse work differently than they really do. No
matter how many decision-splits there are in the multiverse, the laws of
the multiverse must necessarily be obeyed since each one of the
decision-splits must conform to the laws governing those splits. No
amount of variations on possible themes will result in the impossible
happening.
Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible universes.

No it doesn't. There could be three distinct universes infinitely
repeated, for all you know.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3


Which is different from a endless possible Universes wich is what the OP
stated. Correctly.

A
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:35 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Martin Swain wrote:
Quote:
Erwin Hessle wrote:
2 wrote:

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:R_udnZoRSdU1ojDZnZ2dnUVZ_tOdnZ2d@comcast.com...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote:

First, if there is an infinity-of-universes then anything you can imagine
exists in one of them. It is a necessary truth. So be comforted that
somewhere you are correct, but not here and now.

Well, not *anything* you can imagine. For example, you might imagine that
the laws of the multiverse work differently than they really do. No
matter how many decision-splits there are in the multiverse, the laws of
the multiverse must necessarily be obeyed since each one of the
decision-splits must conform to the laws governing those splits. No
amount of variations on possible themes will result in the impossible
happening.

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible universes.


No it doesn't. There could be three distinct universes infinitely
repeated, for all you know.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3


No, because if they were identical, and repeated, they would be the same
one, by the identity principle.

Put your pointy hat on. Take it off when you can keep up.


lol. Might take a while.

A
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Tom111
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 173

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:36 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Urmrg.43757$B91.13284@edtnps82...
Quote:

"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...

"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...

"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...

Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!


Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why?
Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers
and therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers.
Only integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an
infinite, but bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble
within the infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be
obeyed by all possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of
possibilities within that multiverse are infinite.

an infinity of infinites = infinity.

So what? Infinity does not have to be unbounded. I'm saying a multiverse
contaning an infinite number of possibilities does not have to include
impossibilities. If you are trying to argue that infinity must never have
any bounds, you are simply wrong.

Quote:
The only bound on the infinite set of universes is that is has to contain
only universes, which is no bound at all, because the universe itself
contains everything.

Now you're trying to change your definition. Previously, you defined the
universe as containing everything possible. Do you now want to claim it
contains everything impossible, too? Who, besides you, claims that this is
an accurate definition of the universe? It sounds very much like you are
confusing your imaginary construct of the universe with the universe it
represents. This fundamental confusion of inner and outer leads to all
sorts of errors.
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:40 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Erwin Hessle wrote:
Quote:
2 wrote:
"Erwin Hessle" <erwin@erwinhessle.com> wrote:

No it doesn't. There could be three distinct universes infinitely
repeated, for all you know.
That was not the posit, you moron. The posit was an infinity of universes.

Three distinct universes repeated an infinite number of times *is* an
infinity of universes, cockfag.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3


But not an infinite number of possible universes as the OP stated. Do
you not really understand the distinction?

A
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:41 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Erwin Hessle wrote:
Quote:
Martin Swain wrote:
"Erwin Hessle" <erwin@erwinhessle.com> wrote in message
news:1152233057.712110.127920@k73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Martin Swain wrote:
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...
"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:R_udnZoRSdU1ojDZnZ2dnUVZ_tOdnZ2d@comcast.com...
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote:
First, if there is an infinity-of-universes then anything you can
imagine exists in one of them. It is a necessary truth. So be
comforted
that somewhere you are correct, but not here and now.
Well, not *anything* you can imagine. For example, you might imagine
that the laws of the multiverse work differently than they really do.
No
matter how many decision-splits there are in the multiverse, the laws
of
the multiverse must necessarily be obeyed since each one of the
decision-splits must conform to the laws governing those splits. No
amount of variations on possible themes will result in the impossible
happening.
Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes.
Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination cannot
conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have persons
who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!

Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it
repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one.
If you say it can't repeat indefinitely, you've put a limit on it.
Well, in the first place, indefinitely is not infinitley.

Alright, I'll give you that one.

In the second place, in terms of the contents of the set, I haven't
put a limit on the number of elements. I have only described some
properties of the set.

Sounds like exactly what I did, to me.

Get out of that one, Einstein.
I dunno, are you convinced?

I was never convinced in the first place. Frankly, I think this whole
idea of infinite universes arises as a result of an imperfect model
constructed to overcome practical difficulties in measurement. I don't
think anyone seriously believes they might actually exist.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3


It rather depends upon how you define 'Universes'.

A
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:42 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Erwin Hessle wrote:
Quote:
Martin Swain wrote:
"Erwin Hessle" <erwin@erwinhessle.com> wrote in message
news:1152233057.712110.127920@k73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Martin Swain wrote:
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...
"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:R_udnZoRSdU1ojDZnZ2dnUVZ_tOdnZ2d@comcast.com...
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote:
First, if there is an infinity-of-universes then anything you can
imagine exists in one of them. It is a necessary truth. So be
comforted
that somewhere you are correct, but not here and now.
Well, not *anything* you can imagine. For example, you might imagine
that the laws of the multiverse work differently than they really do.
No
matter how many decision-splits there are in the multiverse, the laws
of
the multiverse must necessarily be obeyed since each one of the
decision-splits must conform to the laws governing those splits. No
amount of variations on possible themes will result in the impossible
happening.
Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes.
Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination cannot
conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have persons
who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!

Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it
repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one.
If you say it can't repeat indefinitely, you've put a limit on it.
Well, in the first place, indefinitely is not infinitley.

Alright, I'll give you that one.

I rather think he took it actually.

A
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Archangelska
science forum beginner


Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 36

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:45 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Tom wrote:
Quote:
"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...
Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible universes.
Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination cannot
conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have persons
who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!

Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why? Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying it
repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The set
of integers,
for instance, is infinite.

But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers and
therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers. Only
integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an infinite, but
bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble within the
infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be obeyed by all
possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of possibilities
within that multiverse are infinite.




irrelevant.

A
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Martin Swain
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:58 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Tom wrote:

Quote:
"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Urmrg.43757$B91.13284@edtnps82...


"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...


"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...


"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...


Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!



Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why?
Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.


But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers
and therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers.
Only integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an
infinite, but bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble
within the infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be
obeyed by all possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of
possibilities within that multiverse are infinite.


an infinity of infinites = infinity.



So what? Infinity does not have to be unbounded. I'm saying a multiverse
contaning an infinite number of possibilities does not have to include
impossibilities. If you are trying to argue that infinity must never have
any bounds, you are simply wrong.



Not in this case. The spec was an infinity of universes, which would be
the least bound set
of infinities anyone could ever cook up. Unless you know of a bigger
starting point than everything.

Don't forget that no-one knows exactly *what* the universe is at this
point. For now, all we can
say about it is that it is everything. All things. All time, past,
present and future, all possiblities.
Times infinity. This is, as far as I can tell, simply the definitition
of inifinty.

I didn't make this up, it's your construct. I think it's just a bit
bigger than you initially realised.
Things tend to blow up pretty good when they go to infinity. Either that
or get really small.

Quote:


The only bound on the infinite set of universes is that is has to contain
only universes, which is no bound at all, because the universe itself
contains everything.



Now you're trying to change your definition. Previously, you defined the
universe as containing everything possible. Do you now want to claim it
contains everything impossible, too? Who, besides you, claims that this is
an accurate definition of the universe? It sounds very much like you are
confusing your imaginary construct of the universe with the universe it
represents. This fundamental confusion of inner and outer leads to all
sorts of errors.



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Martin Swain
science forum beginner


Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 3:17 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Tom wrote:

Quote:
"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:jkmrg.43756$B91.10515@edtnps82...


"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:fICdnRNLnNz6cjDZnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@comcast.com...


"Martin Swain" <martin_swain@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:M0irg.43622$B91.23488@edtnps82...


"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote in message
news:12ar11ohlehra9@news.supernews.com...


Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible
universes. Surely one of them has physics our impoverished imagination
cannot conceive of, and that includes the universe which does not have
persons who are stuck in decision-split concepts, or persons at all!



Yes that's right. Using the idea here defined a decision point, over
an infinite span of decisions all possibilities would occur. Why?
Because
that's what infinite means. Someone could say "yes, but what if it just
repeats
infinitely?" except, by allowing that, you've put a limit on it, saying
it repeats infinitely
and called it done, but infinite means there is always a next one. The
set of integers,
for instance, is infinite.


But there are an infinite number of real numbers that are not integers
and therefore are not going to be included in the infinity of integers.
Only integers belong to that set. The set of all integers is an
infinite, but bounded, set. There are no non-integers that are possioble
within the infinity of integers. Thus, there may be rules that must be
obeyed by all possibilities in the multiverse, even when the number of
possibilities within that multiverse are infinite.


The set of integers is a subset of the set of real numbers, which is
infinite.



But the set of integers is infinite, too. And bounded.

And the set of all real numbers, although infinite, does not include
imaginary numbers, which means it's bounded, too.



Yes but the problem with the comparison is, w.r.t. numbers we are
talking about ordered sets.

Your original proposition was for possibilities, which is not an ordered
set.

The corresponding number set would be the infinite set of all possible
numbers, which would include real numbers,
imaginary numbers, irrational numbers and so on. All the other number
sets, including the infinite
ones, would be subsets of this one.
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Erwin Hessle
science forum beginner


Joined: 06 Jul 2006
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 4:39 pm    Post subject: Re: A theory of magick, and the importance of catholic belief. Reply with quote

Archangel wrote:
Quote:
Erwin Hessle wrote:
2 wrote:
"Tom" <askpermission@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:R_udnZoRSdU1ojDZnZ2dnUVZ_tOdnZ2d@comcast.com...
"2" <nhoj@droffats.ten> wrote:
First, if there is an infinity-of-universes then anything you can imagine
exists in one of them. It is a necessary truth. So be comforted that
somewhere you are correct, but not here and now.
Well, not *anything* you can imagine. For example, you might imagine that
the laws of the multiverse work differently than they really do. No
matter how many decision-splits there are in the multiverse, the laws of
the multiverse must necessarily be obeyed since each one of the
decision-splits must conform to the laws governing those splits. No
amount of variations on possible themes will result in the impossible
happening.
Infinity means just exactly that - unbounded, endless possible universes.

No it doesn't. There could be three distinct universes infinitely
repeated, for all you know.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3


Which is different from a endless possible Universes wich is what the OP
stated. Correctly.

Except that's not what he stated. What he actually stated was
"infinity-of-universes."

Do learn to read, fuckwit. I know it's not your strong point, but do
try.

Erwin Hessle, 8=3
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