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chemistry --> chemical engineering
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Derfel
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: STEAM JET EJECTORS Reply with quote

"Rufus" <rufus@home.com> wrote in message news:<bOHNd.1582$K_6.678@newsfe1-win.ntli.net>...
Quote:
Ulrich, G.D. and Vasedevan, P.T. (2004) "Chemical Engineering Process Design
and Economics A Practical Guide", Process Publishing, Durham, New Hampshire.
ISBN 0-9708768-2-3


Hi Rufus.
I usually use the Perry's for rough investment extimations. Does this
book cover pharma and food industry field too?

Thanks

Derfel
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Derfel
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: calculating the dew point of a binary mixture Reply with quote

Oliver Neukum <oliver@neukum.name> wrote in message news:<ct0lbj$m58$02$1@news.t-online.com>...
Quote:
Hi,

could somebody tell me where to find literature on the dew point of
a binary mixture of acetic acid and water?

Regards
Oliver


Hi Oliver
At atmospheric pressure I found a VLE data table in the Distillation
chapter of Perry's.

Derfel
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Derfel
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Heat transfer across a gas liquid interface Reply with quote

Mark Brantana <mark-brantana@houston.rr.com> wrote in message >
Quote:
Thanks for your imput.

Interesting problem. I suppose you have already found the solution. Am i right?

Derfel
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Rich Lemert
science forum beginner


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: chemistry --> chemical engineering Reply with quote

Nathan.ms@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
I recently graduated from UC, Berkeley with a degree in chemistry. I'm
considering trying to make the move to Chem E. for grad school. I've
taken a few engineering classes but I realize I will have to make-up a
significant amount of coursework in Chem E. I've taken all the EE,
physics, and math required for Chem E. Actually, more than all the
physics. I'm also pretty good with Matlab.

Some schools appear to have a fairly open attitude towards students
with other majors, others are completely closed off. Also, some schools
allow students to take 4-5 core chem E courses
and proceed to the MS program, others make you take every course.

I realize I will most likely not be accepted to a top 20 school.

Why not? Unless you've just barely squeeked through your classes,
you've already proven you can handle one of the "big boys". (more below)
Quote:

Has anyone here gone through the same situation? Can anyone recommend
school(s) for this situation? I have a 3.4 GPA and 760 Math GRE and a
year of work experience. I'm only interested in a MS degree. Thanks in
advance for the help.


I was personally in a little better shape than you - I had a
chemistry degree and a process-related degree (Metallurgical Eng. with a
focus on ore refining and processing), so I didn't have to take _all_
the undergraduate curriculum. IIRC, I only had to take 8 undergraduate
courses on my way to the master's. Conversely, I've known people with
physics, biology, and even teaching degrees that have gone back to
school for a ChemE (some grad school, some for a second BS) that had to
pretty much do the entire core curriculum. Even there, though, they
didn't have to repeat the electives, humanities, general studies, etc.
courses normally required for the degree.

For the record, the physicist was doing her graduate work at
Texas-Austin (a top-ten program), while the biologist and teacher were
in one of my classes the year I taught at Clemson.

The best thing you can do is talk to someone - most likely whoever is
responsible for graduate admissions - at the programs you're interested
in. Give them a copy of your transcript so they can see what you've
done. (You might also want to have a copy of your school catalog handy
so you can show them the course description - could come in handy to
show the content of any 'borderline' classes they might excuse you
from.) Have them go through their program and tell you which course they
would have you take, and which classes they would let you slide past.
Don't be afraid to challenge them if you think you've had substantially
the same material, but be prepared to back up your challenge (copy of
the course syllabus, lecture notes, etc). Just remember, though, that
while you may have had a thermo course, there's a lot of engineering
thermo that just isn't covered in a chemistry course.

At the end of your discussion, you should have a document that lists
the courses you and he agree you will need to take to fill your
undergraduate deficiencies (this is why it's best if you can have this
meeting face-to-face - not always something that's practical). If you're
conducting this meeting over the phone, have them send you a copy of the
list on official stationary (they probably have a form for this purpose).

There are two resources you should check to find out 1) where you
want to go, and 2) who to contact there. For 1), the journal Chemical
Engineering Education puts out an annual grad school issue (they're a
quarterly journal) that contains ads from just about every graduate
chemical engineering program in the country. They vary in informational
content, but most of them will at least list research areas that their
faculty are active in. They'll also often list who to contact for
admissions - except that sometimes it will be "Director of Graduate
Admissions." This is where 2) comes in. This is the Directory of
Chemical Engineering Faculty. It lists the faculty of essentially every
chemical engineering program in North America, and quite a few of the
faculty elsewhere in the Western world, all with their direct contact
information. Both of these should be readily available in the ChemE
dept. at Berkeley.

Good luck.

Rich Lemert
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Rufus
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: STEAM JET EJECTORS Reply with quote

I've always favoured Ulrich's text for short-cut design and equipment
costing. There was a first edition which may be easier to get your hands on,
but here is the reference for the latest version.

Ulrich, G.D. and Vasedevan, P.T. (2004) "Chemical Engineering Process Design
and Economics A Practical Guide", Process Publishing, Durham, New Hampshire.
ISBN 0-9708768-2-3
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Dan Spisak
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 1:40 pm    Post subject: Re: chemistry --> chemical engineering Reply with quote

snip
Quote:

ChemEng went into decline since the collapse of the oil prices during
the early 80s. That's when ChemEs, Nuclear Engineers, and a slew of
other energy industry type of majors went into a long term slide. Since
then, ChemE depts have been touting biotech, material science, and any
other subspecialty to entice students to study the field just to learn
the same old petrochemical type of curricula and find themselves
outgunned by a biochemist in a drug company career track or a
pharmacist who can find himself a licensed career track.

The best thing for a chemistry/chem eng to do is to study business,
pharmacy, law, or medicine and forget things like catalysis,
process/reactor design, thermodynamics, and transport phenomena because
the latter coursework results in mediocre opportunities.

Re "ChemEng went into decline". "Chemical Engineering" magazine has about one-half the content that

it had a few years ago. That's OK, it may be due to the economy.

But, what really concerns me is that the State of California is trying to eliminate ChemE's and
allow only Civil's to do the work of ChemE's. If the new legislation goes through only Mechanical's,
Civil's, and Electrical's will be "qualified" to supervise other engineers and manage projects. I
discussed this with an engineering manager at Chevrontexaco and his reply was "I guess we will all
have to become Civil's". Not much support out there for ChemE's..
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John1
science forum beginner


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2005 10:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Surfacants? Reply with quote

<dave.harper@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1115120707.346005.191490@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
What exactly is a "surfacant"? I've been doing some research on
dispersion methods for composite materials, but have yet to find a good
definition for a surfacant... I'm assuming it alters the properties of
a surface? My background is in mechanics, so I'm not well-versed in
this area.

Also, what defines "in-situ" polymerization? Generally I've run into
this term when carbon nanotubes are being introduced into a
polymer-matrix material.

Thanks in advance for any help that can be provided!

Keeping it simple. A surfactant has a hydrophilic functionality on one end
and a hydrophobic functionality on the other. Then, many surfactant
molecules can stabilize an "organic-like" particle in an aqueous media by
surrounding the "organic-like" particle with their hydrophobic end pointing
in towards the "organic-like" particle and their hydrophilic ends pointing
out towards the aqueous media.

In emulsion polymerization "in-situ" polymerization refers to creating a
seed latex from scratch during initiation and growing the particles in the
same reactor immediately after.

--
John
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intell1
science forum beginner


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 7:06 am    Post subject: Re: chemistry --> chemical engineering Reply with quote

Nathan.ms@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
I recently graduated from UC, Berkeley with a degree in chemistry. I'm
considering trying to make the move to Chem E. for grad school. I've
taken a few engineering classes but I realize I will have to make-up a
significant amount of coursework in Chem E. I've taken all the EE,
physics, and math required for Chem E. Actually, more than all the
physics. I'm also pretty good with Matlab.

Some schools appear to have a fairly open attitude towards students
with other majors, others are completely closed off. Also, some schools
allow students to take 4-5 core chem E courses
and proceed to the MS program, others make you take every course.

I realize I will most likely not be accepted to a top 20 school.

Has anyone here gone through the same situation? Can anyone recommend
school(s) for this situation? I have a 3.4 GPA and 760 Math GRE and a
year of work experience. I'm only interested in a MS degree. Thanks in
advance for the help.


Have you ever thought of making the transition to biotech instead? It
seems like a promising field where specialization through a good PhD can
take you a long way. Being a ChE myself, I would certainly look into it.

Just my 2c,
Nikolas
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Curious Guy
science forum beginner


Joined: 09 May 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 12:47 pm    Post subject: Re: job description Reply with quote

On 2005-04-27, tomas <popay73@yahoo.com> wrote:
Quote:
-what is chemical engineer employed in industry ( petrochemical ), as a
proccess engineer supossed to do ?
-can u give me answer in more detail,what would he/she be in charge of,what
to learn or concentrate on,what is needed to know relating plant,meaning is
one supossed to learn all plant in detail like operators,or is is more about
how equipment really works and how to fix problems,how to make equipment
work more efficiently...say when one comes into such a plant,what is
expected from him/her,how and what to start learning ?
-thx in advance !


tomas,


my experience is probably unlike most chemical engieners, but I'll try
to answer your question anyway...

I've seen chem e's in positions ranging from similar to that of a
technician all the way to research positions. It all depends on your
skill level and interest.

In general however, many chem e's become 'owner' of some process. and
yes - they need to know how the equipment works and all aspects of the
process. Usually however, technicians or operators are available for
the more mundance work that can be followed routinely.

I, personally , am in research in the 'hi-tech' industry and get to run
crazy experiments all day.

If you want more details, feel free to e-mail me.

-dr curious
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Walter
science forum beginner


Joined: 14 May 2005
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2005 5:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Substitute for Methanol Reply with quote

I forgot to mention, this is the same as ETOH, or Ethyl Alcohol as a
previous poster suggested.

"Walter" <korfus@mchsi.com> wrote in message
news:vBshe.77914$r53.36061@attbi_s21...
Quote:
This is not a solution, but this thread reminded me of the movie "October
Sky", were the boys went to a bootlegger and got some corn alcohol, a.k.a.
"Moonshine".
I do however, NOT suggest that due to different laws in other Countries as
well in the US.

Walter


"Digit" <wizkdbec@mailcity.com> wrote in message
news:1116075996.019115.70360@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Boric acid in combination with Methanol is used for producing the Green
Flame by Silversmiths.

However, Methanol is banned in our country.

Can you please suggest some substitue for Methanol ?

Thanks.
LS


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Walter
science forum beginner


Joined: 14 May 2005
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2005 4:50 am    Post subject: Re: Substitute for Methanol Reply with quote

isopropyl alcohol burns blue, with a little yellow-orange also, but it might
be due to the fact that it usually contains water. At least when bought as
the usual astringent in the USA. But someone please correct me if that is
wrong. But that is just my experience with the "drug store grade".

Walter

"Digit" <wizkdbec@mailcity.com> wrote in message
news:1116310771.491761.198030@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Will Iso Propyl Alcohol work in place of Methanol ?


Digit wrote:
Boric acid in combination with Methanol is used for producing the
Green
Flame by Silversmiths.

However, Methanol is banned in our country.

Can you please suggest some substitue for Methanol ?

Thanks.
LS
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maison.mousse
science forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2005 5:11 am    Post subject: Re: Substitute for Methanol Reply with quote

robgood1@bestweb.net a écrit dans le message
<1116274062.853964.39030@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
Quote:
maison.mousse wrote:

What laboratory would use MeOH to clean glass ware or
wash lab benches??

I don't know about washing lab benches, but plenty of lab workers use
cheap grades of meOH or acetone to DRY glassware quickly after cleaning
it. The acetone works by the co-distillation principle (in effect, the
evaporating acetone molecules push away water molecules) and does not
have to be anywhere near anhydrous to dry glassware faster. The
methanol works by dissolving the water into a solution of higher vapor
pressure.

Robert


Acetone is used but EtOH would work as well as MeOH
with out the toxicity and at a much lower cost.
By "co-distillation principle " do you mean Raoult's Law
PTotal= Pa+Pb?

I will repeat since you must have missed it. MeOH is not banned in any EU
state. It is not something that would be used in a laboratory to clean
glass ware or lab table tops.

JOL
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Marvin
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 3:27 pm    Post subject: Re: My company has no clue about research & development Reply with quote

J. Schlabotnik wrote:
Quote:
In our company, we need to conduct research and development in the
area of catalysis, related to the oil & gas business.

As is typical, the sales and engineering people in the company have no
idea what is involved in conducting R&D. They think it is simple... do
a few tests, be on the market in a couple months.

I know better, but am seriously outnumbered. They don't believe me
when I say it will take years and big money. It's very frustrating!

I need some good references to books or Internet sources that describe
what is required in good R&D... things like how to do economic
evaluations, risk and failure rate, critical mass, how to select
projects, technology ownership, outsourcing vs in-house work, time
required to commercialization, and so on.

It would be much appreciated if you could point me to some references!

Thanks

J.S.

In my experience, sales people and engineers aren't good at reading. You can lead a
salesman to the library, but ...

Sorry, I don't have a better solution for you. I can only offer the consolation(?) of
knowing that it isn't an unusual problem. When I had the same problem, though perhaps not
as severe as yours, I tried to get management to understand that the biggest profits come
from having innovative products. To the extent that they understood it, they thought it
best to buy a small innovative company.
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TheRomanov
science forum beginner


Joined: 22 May 2005
Posts: 40

PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 5:18 am    Post subject: Re: job description Reply with quote

tomas wrote:
Quote:
-what is chemical engineer employed in industry ( petrochemical ), as
a
proccess engineer supossed to do ?
-can u give me answer in more detail,what would he/she be in charge
of,what
to learn or concentrate on,what is needed to know relating
plant,meaning is
one supossed to learn all plant in detail like operators,or is is
more about
how equipment really works and how to fix problems,how to make
equipment
work more efficiently...say when one comes into such a plant,what is
expected from him/her,how and what to start learning ?
-thx in advance !

Hi Tomas,

I come from a refining and petchem industry but I do different thing
these days though I have been a process engineer before.

Process engineers normally is given area of process for him/her to look
at. In other case, instead of responsible with specific process units,
the engineer is asked to look after particular unit operation within
the whole process units. In the former case, you'll be monitoring not
just the process performance but also equipment (unit operations)
within that process unit. As such, you may need to know how most
equipment work on top of the process unit. As for the latter, you only
need to be specialised in say distillation or conversion (i.e. reactor
process) or heater but you still need to understand the process.
Besides that, you'll be advising the production or operation people on
a day to day basis if any. You'll also be expected to do the following
but not limted to

- a study on long term process improvement or optimisation
- conducting equipment inspection during turnaround

Generally when one join an industry like this, he/she will go through a
training which includes attachment with the plant operation. The person
will work in shift beginning as field operator until to the panel
operator. He/she is expected to learn through the time in operation as
much as possible and establish relationship with the operation's
personnel. There are several important things that one need to know or
have the information with as a process engineer namely;

- P&ID
- Basic design or licensor's process design
- Licensor's manual

The above explanation is not exhaustive and taken into account that one
is already holding a degree in Chemical Engineering.

Let me know if there are more information required.
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number6
science forum addict


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 67

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 10:22 am    Post subject: Re: My company has no clue about research & development Reply with quote

muha wrote:
Quote:
if you hear "synergies" you should run - it means that some management
zombies got "out of the box" and are looking for fresh brains to eat
and infect. number6 was bitten apparently. So sad.


You miss my point ... I was giving advice to a researcher ...on how to
make the management zombies run and cower in fear ...
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