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watt meter
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amorrisonca1@yahoo.ca
science forum beginner


Joined: 06 Jun 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: 150psi 500fahr valve, help! Reply with quote

Post also to www.eng-tips.com
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Ed Ruf
science forum beginner


Joined: 19 Jun 2005
Posts: 40

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Glue for an oven door. Reply with quote

On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 17:23:44 -0000, in sci.engr.mech "simon"
<webmaster@srsteel.co.uk> wrote:

Quote:
My oven door has come apart.

It has two plastic locating brackets that are held onto the glass panel
using what looks like silicone sealant.
They've come off...

I did try sticking back with Araldite with no success.
Can anyone reccomend a better adhesive for the job. Is silicone sealant
suitable??

Others have mentioned regular and high temp silicones. If you are looking
for a high temp epoxy, JBWeld, which can be found at most auto parts stores
for under $5, will go to 600F.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
http://EdwardGRuf.com
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Anton Jopko
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: watt meter Reply with quote

Chris,
First off I live in ontario which may be why the meters are so different. But
your answer of 150 turns per kwh is not very far off my result
since 150x7.2 watt-h=1.08 Kwh. The Kh 7.2 is posted on the front of the meter.
(It is not Kwh)
Thanks for responding to my query.
Best Regards,
anton


nk that's unlikely. The domestic watt-hour meters I've seen turn
Quote:
at
either 150, 225 or 250 revolutions per kWh. 7.2 revolutions per kWh
seems much too slow, and 7.2 revolutions per Wh would be 7200
revolutions per kWh, which is too fast. Whereabouts on the meter does
it
say "kh 7.2"? Do you have a picture of the meter, or know the maker's
name and model number? It's possible it could be a weird non-standard
meter. Also, might it say "kWh 7.2" instead of "kh 7.2"?

Best wishes,

Chris Tidy
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Ed Ruf
science forum beginner


Joined: 19 Jun 2005
Posts: 40

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Subminiature pressure sensor Reply with quote

On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 12:38:59 GMT, in sci.engr.mech Brian Whatcott
<betwys1@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Quote:

True.
I should know better than continue after making a correction - but I
will this time.
Not only was I talking about gases, Ed, so were *you*.
Take a look at this quote of yours:

"I will meet you halfway. c_medium is a function of specific volume
(or density), which is a function of both temperature *and* pressure
(and the specific gas/mixture)."

Brian W Altus

Go back and re-read my post again. That's NOT my reply, it's David's.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
http://EdwardGRuf.com
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dave.harper
science forum addict


Joined: 27 Jun 2005
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Subminiature pressure sensor Reply with quote

Lars Johansson wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 1 Feb 2005, it was written:

It's intracellular fluid in the body; hence the need for as
small as possible equipment.

Does the sensor have to be in the body for a prolonged period? If it's
just for sampling, perhaps you can just place a very narrow duct to the
area in question and measure the pressure in the duct at the other
side. This method is used with a needle to determine swelling-induced
pressure in various parts of the body (ex. snakebite victims). In
essence, you're transporting the pressure outside the tissue to make it
easier to measure.

Hope that helps,
Dave
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anton jopko1
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Glue for an oven door. Reply with quote

there is a high temperature red silicone glue used to glue gaskets around
the doors of airtight woodstoves. check with a stove place for it.
anton

"simon" <webmaster@srsteel.co.uk> wrote in message
news:ctodv0$4vk$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
Quote:
My oven door has come apart.

It has two plastic locating brackets that are held onto the glass panel
using what looks like silicone sealant.
They've come off...

I did try sticking back with Araldite with no success.
Can anyone reccomend a better adhesive for the job. Is silicone sealant
suitable??

SS

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Christopher Tidy
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: watt meter Reply with quote

Quote:
Hi,
on our electric power meter on the side of our house there is a number
called kh 7.2 . I am told that this has to do with the rate that the
aluminum disk turns. Does anyone know if it means 7.2 watt-hours per
revolution of the disk?? any help appreciated.
Thanks
anton

I think that's unlikely. The domestic watt-hour meters I've seen turn at
either 150, 225 or 250 revolutions per kWh. 7.2 revolutions per kWh
seems much too slow, and 7.2 revolutions per Wh would be 7200
revolutions per kWh, which is too fast. Whereabouts on the meter does it
say "kh 7.2"? Do you have a picture of the meter, or know the maker's
name and model number? It's possible it could be a weird non-standard
meter. Also, might it say "kWh 7.2" instead of "kh 7.2"?

Best wishes,

Chris Tidy
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Greg Locock
science forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Help Not Really Wanted: "Green Card Game" Reply with quote

metalengr@hotmail.com wrote in
news:1111509299.393617.219310@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com:

Quote:
Whiney whiney whiney

So, you can't compete in a free market?

Suck it up baby

Cheers

Greg Locock
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sak
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Required Tripod for RADAR Reply with quote

Sounds like you need a design engineer to provide some info - I work
with antennas and pedestal design - I know that I would not provide off
the cuff sizes, structure, etc... based on the parameters u define
above. Some of those require some detailed attention to aid in the
pedestal selection.

try the following site -

www.guru.com
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pjesnik
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: How can I measure accuracy of strain gage placement Reply with quote

First question is it half or full bridge combination of strain gages?

If you have these combinations, you can compesate errors of placements
of strain gages and temperature influences when calibrate your load
cell.
Better control if you are working with one straing gage, that you put
another on opposite side, but first must explain where you wish to put
them to i can give you better answer?

Songman_hr!

486 still rides
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Mathieu Fregeau
science forum beginner


Joined: 14 Feb 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Properties of sound in water Reply with quote

speeds of sound in any fluid (called "a") is :

a = sqrt (gamma * R * T)

where
gamma = Cp/Cv of water (depends on temperature of the fluid, you can find
that in any fluid books)
R = Ru/MW_water
T = absolute temperature, generally in kelvin (depends on the units of R)

Ru is the universal gas constant
MW_water is the water atomic weight, can be found in any chemical reference

---------
Mathieu Fregeau

"Tom Kurowski" <tom_kurowski@hoooooooooootmail.com> wrote in message
news:qtSdnWYs5-qJbm7cRVn-vw@rogers.com...
Quote:
Hello,
I'm in my first year of engineering, and I have a project that involves
the scrambling of data using sound.
The set up is as follows:
-input a 4 digit number into a computer
-the computer scrambles the number using matrix algebra
-each number from the matrix has an associated sound to it (for a maximum
of 18 sounds)
-the sound will be send through water via a submerged speaker
-the sound will be received via a submerged microphone

now here is where I'm stuck. I need to know what effects water has on
sound. I know for sure that the velocity changes. But in order to
continue my project, I have to be able to calculate what the original
source sound is.
Would the sound change frequency?

Anyways, once received and re-calculated, the sound would be reassigned to
its number between 1-18 and be put back through the inverse matrix to
retrieve the original 4 digit code.

Thank you for any help
-Tom Kurowski
tom_kurowski@ hot mail [dot] com
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Mathieu Fregeau
science forum beginner


Joined: 14 Feb 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Electrical conduction through a rotating element Reply with quote

look at how a generator or any electrical motor works. There is a rotor and
a stator, the rotor is charged (or charging), and so needs to pass current
to the body of the motor, which does not roll obviously! You will notice
small "broom" on the rotor shaft. You can also look at an alternator from
any car engine.

--
---------
Mathieu Fregeau

"Rob" <rdsfal@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message
news:41e78814$0$9707$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Quote:

"Brian Whatcott" <betwys1@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:bjpau05qht22ubt6ih63ppnr812ts1glan@4ax.com...
On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 17:43:16 GMT, "Michael"
mbush@light-deletedashtodash-houseoptics.com> wrote:

go to www.mcmaster.com and search for "rotating electrical connectors"



"Jim" <newsgroup23@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1105487869.911820.128310@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Does anyone have any successful examples of passing an electrical
signal from a rotating shaft to an outer housing?

In my application the compnents are in abrasive fluid flowing up to
50ft/sec, at pressures up to 25,000psi and temperatures up to 300 deg
F. The rotary part is also rotating eccentrically. I have tried to
use a bearing as a slip ring but I get intermittent contact.
Any suggestions appreciated



Find a common axis of rotation. Use a moving to fixed loop
transformer. You need to modulate the signal appropriately.
This never leaks. Ever.

Brian W

Good suggestion Brian. Jim, a video head from an old VCR is a good example
to look at - without the slurry, temp, pressure etc.
rob

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Mathieu Fregeau
science forum beginner


Joined: 14 Feb 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: stainless steel or chromed steel Reply with quote

Stainless steel is steel containing chrome. The question does not really
make sense. The question would be what stainless steel grade should you use
(i.e. what % of chrome you want). You might mean steel with chrome plating
instead of stainless steel? Plating and material selection is 2 things. You
select the material for the structure requirement and corrosion resistance,
than if you can't afford building a complete piece of stainless, you can do
a plating over normal steel, or even painting. But plating could wear (as
well as painting), and you have to be careful if the piece has to accept
hits or would have to be machined after plating process, etc.. small holes
might be completely filled by the plating process too, which would be
undesirable.

stainless would be preferable in any case, but it might add lots on the
cost... specially if that's for serial production.

I suggest you look into the mechanical handbook on stainless alloys
properties.

--
---------
Mathieu Fregeau

"--" <dehoberg@comcast.com> wrote in message
news:PqOdnQa_NKGNK2vcRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
Quote:

"motorguy" <newastroguy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e68039df.0406161257.1b7d8a24@posting.google.com...
Friends,

I'm designing a gear drive for my robot. A center shaft for the gears
was to be made from stainless steel. But out of curiosity, has
anybody used chromed steel for such application? Any drawback to such
usage? Chromed should withstand wear better, correct?
Any input will be much appreciated. Thanks.

Al

from memory:

there are more kinds of stainless than there are satellite channels

start with 17-4 ph and check some of its charactersitics at various quench
temperatures, and then check out the 400 series martensitics.

--Chromed steel is only as resistant as stainless if it the steel gets
nickel plated before the chrome.
--The coeff of friction of chrome is lower than steel, making it a
preferred
coating for hyd cylinders. Buit there is a little more to the efficiency
gains than just swapping up
-- wear depends more on pressure and upper limits of the materials (200psi
al-stl, 3000 psi stl-bronze, etc) than the particular material
--and use of chrome dip depends on your bearing - the tolerances from
slapping a hot gob of chrome on a steel rod is not going to sit well with
many bearings -

and then there's chrome on soft steel vs chrome on hardened steel.

best to find some nice ground and polished stainless shafting stock. all
the
hard work is done for you.

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Christopher Tidy
science forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:02 pm    Post subject: Re: watt meter Reply with quote

Quote:
I think that's unlikely. The domestic watt-hour meters I've seen turn

at
either 150, 225 or 250 revolutions per kWh. 7.2 revolutions per kWh
seems much too slow, and 7.2 revolutions per Wh would be 7200
revolutions per kWh, which is too fast. Whereabouts on the meter does
it
say "kh 7.2"? Do you have a picture of the meter, or know the maker's
name and model number? It's possible it could be a weird non-standard
meter. Also, might it say "kWh 7.2" instead of "kh 7.2"?

Best wishes,

Chris Tidy

Apologies, my mistake. I thought you said 7.2 revolutions per watt-hour,
not 7.2 watt-hours per revolution. The meters I've seen state
revolutions per kWh, which is why I got confused.

Yes, 7.2 watt-hours per revolution would be a sensible figure. Is "kh"
the only thing it says?

Chris
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Bret Cahill
science forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 480

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:34 pm    Post subject: Re: H2O For A Lighter Than [Dry] Air Balloon Reply with quote

We're good for more than 30 C. In fact, we'll be doing better than
FORTY (40) C in a few weeks.

Every time you breath here you are losing water.

The governor is screaming bloody murder because the forest service is
overhauling all its fire fighting tanker planes while a lot of Johnson
grass is drying out in the desert.

Know what happens to a Sahuaro full of water when a brush fire hits it?


Popcorn.


Bret Cahill
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