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Forum index » Science and Technology » Engineering » Mechanics
division of forces
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kkrish
science forum beginner


Joined: 06 Jun 2006
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 7:24 am    Post subject: division of forces Reply with quote

hi all,
how to find the division of one force by another force
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N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
science forum Guru


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 2835

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 7:41 am    Post subject: Re: division of forces Reply with quote

Dear kkrish:

"kkrish" <clearminded.kkrish@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1150529074.057431.84930@y41g2000cwy.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
hi all,
how to find the division of one force by
another force

Forces are vectors, and division of vectors is not easily done.

What do you mean?
What are you trying to do?

David A. Smith
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kkrish
science forum beginner


Joined: 06 Jun 2006
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 9:57 am    Post subject: Re: division of forces Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply,

I want to find the ratio of effect of one vector from a reference
point to another vector from the same reference point.Yes, they are
vectors.How to find the ratio?Is there any method to find the ratio.It
will be of great help.
1.vector A at an angle theta1
2.vector b at an angle theta2
how to find the ratio of vector A to vector B.
I have a circular disk of metal.There are two points in
the disk which are not uniform and have some manufacturing defect on
the surface.Due to non uniformity there will be two forces acting on
the disk when the disk rotates.I want to measure the two forces from a
reference point on the disk.And i want to study the effect of the
forces when the reference point or any of the other two points change.
Thank you.




N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc) wrote:
Quote:
Dear kkrish:

"kkrish" <clearminded.kkrish@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1150529074.057431.84930@y41g2000cwy.googlegroups.com...
hi all,
how to find the division of one force by
another force

Forces are vectors, and division of vectors is not easily done.

What do you mean?
What are you trying to do?

David A. Smith
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N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
science forum Guru


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 2835

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 3:56 pm    Post subject: Re: division of forces Reply with quote

Dear kkrish:

"kkrish" <clearminded.kkrish@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1150538263.885381.313210@g10g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Thanks for your reply,

I want to find the ratio of effect of one vector from
a reference point to another vector from the same
reference point.

Each force then can be broken down into components:
- from the center to the point of action: "dot product"
- perpendicular to the line above, not necessarily in the plane
of the disk: "cross product"

Quote:
Yes, they are vectors.How to find the ratio?Is there
any method to find the ratio. It will be of great help.
1.vector A at an angle theta1
2.vector b at an angle theta2
how to find the ratio of vector A to vector B.
I have a circular disk of metal.There are
two points in the disk which are not uniform and
have some manufacturing defect on the surface.
Due to non uniformity there will be two forces
acting on the disk when the disk rotates.I want
to measure the

...."effect of the" ...

Quote:
two forces from a reference point on the disk.And
i want to study the effect of the forces when the
reference point or any of the other two points change.

Typically you will form the products I mention above, and create
a "free body diagram". The forces, once the products above have
been formed for each reference point, can be shown acting on the
reference point. The cross product terms are torques. Be very
careful with the signs. The dot product terms describe linear
acceleration.

If the disk is free to rotate, then the forces must provide
whatever angular acceleration is observed.

If the manufacturing defect only provides a place for friction to
be creating one or both forces, then you will also have a
component of one or both forces that is normal to the plane of
the disk, and this component will be *included* in the component
you get with the cross product. Then you will need torque
information about the bearing the disk can rotate on.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_product
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_product

If it was easy, they would not call it work. And you would not
get paid for it.

David A. Smith
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